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The St Louis Contrarian

Providing Independent and Intelligent Insight on St. Louis Public Policy Issues

The Curious Effect of AirBnB

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Writing in “Building“, Andrew Sobchak and Laura LeBlanc look at short term rentals (STR’s) in Vancouver, from a broad perspective including small and large players.

airbnb

Perceived issues?  Well, a few of them are listed to kick off the article.  Plus opinion and data (pro and con) to sharpen thought about these issues’ merits.

Headlines have been turning on Airbnb for the better part of two years, first in cities like San Francisco and New York, then, with more frequency in 2016, as the platform achieved scale in other cities. At a time in Vancouver of peak foreign investment and plummeting vacancy, advocacy groups lined up in opposition:

  • Renters claimed Airbnb siphoned away long-term rental stock, thereby driving up prices
  • Hotel industry lobbies claimed Airbnb facilitated the operation of informal hotels, reducing bottom lines and threatening employment
  • Condominium boards and neighbourhood associations claimed Airbnb increased transience, decreasing safety and…

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How Cities Can Promote Affordable Housing

How Housing Matters has an article about the above referenced subject. They point to an issue that I have frequently pointed out, zoning, land use, lack of density make affordable housing more difficult to do. Interestingly, the article shows that inclusionary zoning, a darling of the academic elite and the Urban Land Institute, has little effect even in those rare places where it is approved. Written by Paul Dribin

Copy of article from How Housing Matters:

How Can Cities Produce More Affordable Housing?

August 03, 2017

Though cities have recovered from the 2008 recession, housing market trends have created new burdens. Gentrification has taken the form of “new build” housing in recent years, and the demand for housing in formerly depressed neighborhoods has skyrocketed—as have rents. Meanwhile, wages for low- and moderate-income families are stagnant, and federal subsidies for affordable housing have declined. In their article, Lance Freeman and Jenny Schuetz describe housing (particularly rental) affordability in rising markets, review strategies and policies addressing assistance for poor households in inner cities, and provide suggestions for more effective and sustainable affordable housing policies. They present the idea that for any policy tackling housing affordability to be successful, it must take a holistic approach that bridges human development and housing. They urge supporting neighborhoods, schools, crime, and other factors that affect quality of life, in addition to housing, to effectively and sustainably produce affordable housing.

Key findings

The most widely used policies that address housing affordability, such as inclusionary zoning, have produced few affordable units and do not help much with overall housing affordability. The authors found that in the areas they studied, inclusionary zoning produced less than 0.1 percent of the affordable housing stock. A better understanding of why this is depends on recording better data on these programs.
Cities and counties should reduce regulatory burdens of development to reduce the cost of new housing.
Local governments should increase zoning density limits to allow for the production of small, low-cost units.
Local governments and nonprofits working on housing affordability need to attract and use private funding. This will help create an economically diverse housing stock, which is important for labor markets to function and for family and community well-being.

Homeless Prevention

An article in How Housing Matters makes an important point about homelessness in cities such as St. Louis. That article demonstrates the most successful approach to combating homelessness is a housing first model. This approach requires building affordable supportive housing for homeless people, housing them, and providing supportive services at the same time.

An interesting point about the St. Louis homeless situation. Biddle House run by St. Patrick’s Center serves anyone who wants it 3 meals a day, 7 days a week. When the Larry Rice shelter closed, people at Biddle prepared for more clients. They never came. We suspect Larry never had as many clients as he claimed. Written by Paul Dribin

Here is the copy of the article from How Housing Matters:

What Cities Can Do to Combat Homelessness

August 03, 2017

by Steven Brown

The most recent Annual Homeless Assessment Report to Congress points out the number of people experiencing homelessness has fallen every year since 2010, representing a 13.7 percent drop between 2010 and 2016. Homelessness fell even more dramatically among certain subpopulations over the same period. Chronic homelessness fell 27 percent, veterans homelessness was cut by nearly half and was eliminated in dozens of places across the country, and homelessness among families with children decreased 23 percent.

Though the number of people experiencing homelessness has declined nationally, many large cities have experienced increases in their homeless populations. Since 2010, homelessness increased slightly more than 1 percent. In many of these cities, the number of people in shelters has decreased while the number of people on the street has gone up dramatically. In Los Angeles, the number of people experiencing homelessness went up more than 33 percent in the past two years and increased more than 42 percent for people outside of shelter. In New York City, homelessness spiked 39 percent in the past year. Chicago, Denver, Seattle, and several other large cities saw similar increases.

Despite the trends, many cities—including Atlanta, Cleveland, and New Orleans—experienced significant declines in homelessness. What are these cities doing well? Houston is a prime example. After a peak in homelessness in 2011, Houston adopted a Housing First model for addressing homelessness. Officials and homelessness providers in the areas developed the Houston/Harris County Continuum of Care in 2012 and worked with local agencies to create The Way Home, an action plan with goals to address area homelessness. The goals of The Way Home are to

create a system to identify the chronically homeless and match them to appropriate affordable housing,
coordinate a service system to support long-term housing stability, and
create enough permanent housing to meet the demand.
Before The Way Home, area service providers and nonprofits were an uncoordinated “tangle of services,” but the city worked to coordinate local efforts, including adopting the Homeless Management Information System to match people to appropriate, stable housing within 30 days of system entry and assessment. The city redirected over $100 million in federal, state, and local funding, with help from local businesses, to build and maintain over 2,500 additional permanent supportive housing units with wraparound services. Since the introduction of The Way Home, homelessness in Houston, Harris, and Fort Bend counties has fallen 60 percent, and their Continuum of Care was recently recognized as one of 50 in the country that has effectively ended veterans homelessness.

The gains Houston has made toward ending homelessness through a Housing First approach and coordinated entry are laudable and impressive. Other cities have tried or are trying similar approaches, yet still struggle with a steady or growing homeless population.

One additional reason the gains may have been more effective in Houston is their more accessible housing market. According to US Department of Housing and Urban Development data, the fair market rent for a one-bedroom rental in Harris County stayed flat between 2011 ($767 a month) and 2016 ($773), and the most recent Census Bureau data for the county show an 8.9 percent vacancy in rental housing. Atlanta, Cleveland, and New Orleans have also used a Housing First approach and seen their homeless populations fall, and so have other cities with comparably lower rents and slower rental growth.

Compare this with Seattle and King County, which saw a 25 percent increase in fair market rent for one-bedroom rentals (2011: $977, 2016: $1,225) and has a rental vacancy rate of 3.4 percent. Decreasing housing affordability in an area can make it more difficult for people on the margins to stay in their homes and can prevent people in shelters or permanent supportive housing from jumping into private market housing.

But cities, including many coastal ones, with rising rents and rising populations experiencing homelessness can still fight the rising tide. Boston has experienced recent spikes in homelessness, but is in a state that has a right-to-shelter law. Even though the number of people and the length of stay in emergency shelters is increasing, the number of people “on the street” is among the lowest in the country, and the area is seeing declines in people returning to shelter. Though emergency shelter can have challenges (e.g., turnover, privacy, safety), shelters have the advantage of staff who can help coordinate services and transitions to more stable housing. Boston’s challenge, and the challenge of other cities in a similar position, is to build a better bridge between shelter and self-supported housing.

While homelessness is down in much of the country, many cities still struggle. Cities that have brought down their populations have done so through a Housing First approach, a tight coordination between public, nonprofit, and private stakeholders, and a clear path for permanent and stable housing. Houston’s Housing First, integrated Homeless Management Information System model, and close coordination between agencies have led to an end of veterans homelessness and a nearly 50 percent reduction in homelessness overall. Although rents haven’t risen there as quickly, the approach shows that getting people into permanent supportive housing may be the best solution. The Family Options Study showed that of transitional housing, rapid re-housing, and vouchers, vouchers proved the best option for helping homeless families achieve residential stability, and other studies have shown that rapid re-housing can work in certain contexts.

The best way for cities to help their homeless populations is to house them and support them with services to help them find stable employment, health care, and child care services. Though this may be challenging for cities with limited affordable units and rising rents, these are the steps that must be taken to support these most vulnerable of populations.

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Traffic-Calming: It’s Everywhere

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From Willow (or St. John Paul II Way) and 32nd Ave in Vancouver. Who knew this existed?

Note the roundabout further down the street, and the large stone whose purpose, I presume, is to discourage motor vehicle operators from driving on the grassed area.

Willow.32ndClick to enlarge.

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Tiny Houses

There has been much publicity lately about so called tiny houses which are generally about 250 square feet and can be purchased for about $50000. These houses are not for everyone but I think they are a great idea. They are energy efficient, and get people into the housing market who would not otherwise be eligible to participate. They may be perfect for single individuals or couples.

As of now community planning and zoning requirements to not allow for houses this small and they are being sited in mobile home parks or other unrestricted areas. I have never lived in a residence this small but people all over the world do. Our communities should give it a try. Written by Paul Dribin

Daily Scot – Burnaby Boomtown

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South Gate City

Welcome to Southgate City the largest new master planned community you’ve probably never heard of, I know I hadn’t until adverts started popping up in the Vancouver Sun.  Developed by Ledingham McAllister on the site of the former Safeway distribution facility in South Burnaby, the 60 acre site features a whopping 19 residential towers above podiums.  Site amenities including 5 acres of park space, a gourmet grocer, restaurants, cafés, and a community centre all located internally within the development.

South Gate City-2

Southgate City’s utopian-like glass towers are anchored in floating green space and numerous water fountains with a resounding lack of colour or use of materials.  The architectural renderings show building forms that appear difficult to engage with on a human scale once you get pass the street level podium.

South Gate City-3

It will be interesting to see how it feels when finally constructed but the master plan appears starkly opposite to recent developments…

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Historic Tax Credits for Residential Use

The St. Louis Business Journal had a poll today which appeared critical of State Historic Tax Credits being used on residential properties. These credits are part of the state program which is used primarily on apartments and commercial buildings.

If used properly, the credits can help rejuvenate historic neighborhoods and preserve housing. The criticism seems to be that sometimes people who use these credits don’t need them. A simple solution would be to means test the program so that only households who need the credits will use them. Written by Paul Dribin

Metrolink Safety Again

A big story today. Vince Schoemehl, Chair of Metro, the transit agency said that he thought portions of Metrolink are unsafe. That is an incredible statement for a person of his position. Are we sure we want to invest additional dollars in this operation? Written by Paul Dribin

Student Mentoring

Much of course has been written about poverty, racism, etc. Nothing has worked very well in addressing these problems. Let me propose a very simple idea, mentoring of students.

I have been a mentor at various times in my life and found it a great experience. More important, the young person being mentored and their families seemed to appreciate it.

I am proposing a mentoring program that would address the needs of all the at risk students in the St. Louis metro area. Volunteers need to be sought and programs established. The cost if huge but on a per student basis, quite inexpensive. Furthermore data shows it works.

I am working on starting a program at one school. Anyone else interested?

Not about Switching Diesel/Gas to Electric Cars, It’s all about Walking and Bikes — Price Tags

Source: Bike Boom As reported in the Guardian by Tim Burns, the switch from diesel and gas vehicles is vastly overrated. Sure, there will be an increase in air quality but think of this: the only thing you are changing is the fuel source of “the type of heavy box” that people travel around in and insist on […]

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