Advertisements

The St Louis Contrarian

Providing Independent and Intelligent Insight on St. Louis Public Policy Issues

Archive for the tag “st. louis”

THE CITY OF ST. LOUIS REENTERING ST. LOUIS COUNTY – Cities Strong

THE CITY OF ST. LOUIS REENTERING ST. LOUIS COUNTY – Cities Strong
— Read on citiesstrong.com/hello-world-4/

A challenging article by Terry Jones in the difficulties of St Louis City joining the county

Advertisements

More Bad McKee Stuff

The Post had some thoroughly documented stories about Mr. McKee over the weekend. These stories which were quite difficult to follow seemed to say that once again McKee scammed the tax credit system to derive funds for projects that never materialized. Bad stuff. Written by Paul Dribin

HOPE VI Did Not Meet Expectations?

HOPE VI was a HUD program to totally revamp public housing projects with a mixture of public, affordable, market rate housing, economic development, and social programs. The idea was to revitalize communities, offer a better living environment for tenants, and improve outcomes for low income individuals. An article now shows that far fewer housing units were actually completed under HOPE VI than announced. This is probably not surprising since actual financing and construction will bring more accurate results. My concern is that the program spent billions of dollars and did not achieve the results I described above. I worked on the Darst Webbe HOPE VI project here in St. Louis. It razed some bad public housing and significantly reduced crime in the surrounding neighborhoods. I doubt it had any important effects on the public housing residents and has not resulted in significant mixed income housing. Written by Paul Dribin. Attached is the article.

2018

Share

Tweet

Study Finds “Selective Memory Planning” by HUD in the HOPE VI Program

A study published in Housing Policy Debate, “Broken Promises or Selective Memory Planning? A National Picture of HOPE VI Plans and Realities” by Lawrence Vale, Shomon Shamsuddin, and Nicholas Kelly finds that significantly fewer housing units, particularly market-rate rental and homeownership units, were developed in HOPE VI projects than were initially announced in HOPE VI award announcements. The study contends that HUD’s monitoring of HOPE VI represented “selective memory planning,” in which policy-makers ignore or erase the memory of initial plans and goals in favor of new plans and goals that are more likely to be achieved.

“Housing Opportunities for People Everywhere” (HOPE VI) was a HUD program to redevelop distressed public housing into mixed income communities with a combination of public, affordable, and market-rate housing for both renters and owners. The study’s authors compared the number of units, unit-type mix, and tenure initially announced in HOPE VI award announcements with estimates later entered into HUD’s administrative system for tracking projects’ progress based on revised plans. They also compared the award announcements with actual housing units completed. The authors conducted interviews with HUD staff to gain insight into their decisions.

The projected number of units in HUD award announcements was 11,600 higher than the revised counts eventually entered into HUD’s administrative system for program tracking. The revised estimates were 10% lower than the proposed units initially announced. The revised estimates of expected market-rate units were 29% lower and the revised estimates of expected homeownership units were 40% lower than the initial award announcements. This finding suggests that public housing agencies (PHAs) found market-rate housing and homeownership more difficult to achieve in HOPE VI projects than initially expected.

If a developer had to lower the expected number of housing units or change the unit-type and tenure mix after an award announcement, the new numbers were recorded in HUD’s administrative system. The system did not record the numbers initially proposed in the award announcement. The result is that it may appear a HOPE VI project produced the proposed number of units, unit-type mix, and tenure when the final outcome was less than what was promised in the initial award announcement.

The authors note that, on the other hand, it is reasonable that expected outcomes expressed in award announcements would change as the PHAs would often put projects out to bid to developers and complete financing after the award was announced. Most housing professionals understand that initial project proposals often change before construction begins because of development complexities. Expectations change as knowledge or circumstances change. On the other hand, residents may not understand this and see award announcements as promises to them and their communities.

HUD essentially “forgot” its initial award announcements, the authors contend. The report suggests that by engaging in selective memory planning, HUD prioritized its accountability to Congress and developers over its accountability to communities by comparing outcomes to revised expectations rather than comparing outcomes to the promises made to the community in the initial announcements.

“Broken Promises or Selective Memory Planning? A National Picture of HOPE VI Plans and Realities

Biddle House Will Scale Back One-Stop Homeless Services Under New Provider | News Blog

Starting next week, the city’s primary homeless shelter, Biddle House, will drop services for people not staying overnight. The services, which currently include lunch for…
— Read on www.riverfronttimes.com/newsblog/2018/07/27/biddle-house-will-scale-back-one-stop-homeless-services-under-new-provider

Airport Privatization

The St. Louis Business Journal has reported that the City of St. Louis was warned that their airport privatization advisors were incentivized to push to privatize the airport. The reason for this is they would only be paid if the privatization is successful. Seems logical to me. The airport privatization reminds me of a family that sells their household furniture to pay the monthly bills. Written by Paul Dribin

Loop Trolley Again

The Post wrote yesterday that there is still not a definite date for the start of the Loop Trolley. This is not a surprise. Furthermore when it does begin it will operate only from Thursday to Sunday from noon to 6pm. Does this sound like a winning program? (By the way last week I almost ran into a trolley when I was trying to turn right onto Lindell at the History Museum.). Written by Paul Dribin

St. Louis is a Poorly Run City

According to the website wallet hub, St. Louis is one of the most poorly run cities in the United States. This should come as no surprise to the people who live here or attempt to work with the city. I am constantly surprised by the advocates and housing folks who seem to like it. It reminds me of the wise words of Russ Rodgers, “No system is so screwed up that someone doesn’t like it the way it is.” Written by Paul Dribin

Biddle House and Homelessness in St.Louis

I have previously written that St. Patrick Center and St. Peter’s and Paul who jointly operate Biddle house, a shelter for homeless men, will soon give up their contract with the City of St. Louis who owns the facility. The reason for this decision is that the operation has proven too expensive with the operators losing upwards of $500,000 in the first year.On Tuesdays I volunteer to help serve lunch at Biddle House. I learned today that the City of St. Louis will operate the facility directly. This of course raises some questions;1. Do they have the capacity to run it? St. Patrick Center is a great operator and they could not be successful financially.2. Do they have the financial resources to operate it? Again, if others lost $500,000 operating Biddle, where would the city get the funds to be successful?3. It is apparent that Larry Rice who ran a shelter for years and was finally shut down operated on a shoestring.4. What does this say about the future of homeless care in St. Louis?Written by Paul Dribin

McKee Fight Heats Up

Big time north side developer Paul McKee has faced many difficulties in trying to develop his north side project. The city development agency has attempted to pull the plug on him. Now he and his attorneys are counter suing, stating that the city did not live up to its agreement. Looks like a long and expensive battle. Written by Paul Dribin

Airport Hijinks

Former Mayor Slay has been hired by one of the bidders interested in receiving the contract if Lambert Airport is privatized. That appears of course to be a payoff in addition to Jeff Rainford, the Mayor’s former aide who was previously hired as a consultant to the project. I still don’t understand with all the problems the city has the privatization effort appears to be such a high priority. Written by Paul Dribin

Post Navigation